author_facet Bentley-Hibbert, Stuart I.
Quan, Xin
Newman, Thomas
Huygen, Kris
Godfrey, Henry P.
Bentley-Hibbert, Stuart I.
Quan, Xin
Newman, Thomas
Huygen, Kris
Godfrey, Henry P.
author Bentley-Hibbert, Stuart I.
Quan, Xin
Newman, Thomas
Huygen, Kris
Godfrey, Henry P.
spellingShingle Bentley-Hibbert, Stuart I.
Quan, Xin
Newman, Thomas
Huygen, Kris
Godfrey, Henry P.
Infection and Immunity
Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G
Infectious Diseases
Immunology
Microbiology
Parasitology
author_sort bentley-hibbert, stuart i.
spelling Bentley-Hibbert, Stuart I. Quan, Xin Newman, Thomas Huygen, Kris Godfrey, Henry P. 0019-9567 1098-5522 American Society for Microbiology Infectious Diseases Immunology Microbiology Parasitology http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/iai.67.2.581-588.1999 <jats:title>ABSTRACT</jats:title><jats:p>Antigen 85 (Ag85) complex proteins are major secretory products of<jats:italic>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</jats:italic>and induce strong cellular and humoral immune responses in infected experimental animals and human beings. We have previously shown that nanogram doses of these 30- to 32-kDa fibronectin-binding proteins inhibit local expression of delayed hypersensitivity by a T-cell fibronectin-dependent mechanism. Circulating levels of Ag85 might be expected to be elevated in patients with active tuberculosis and possibly to play a role in systemic anergy in these patients. To test this hypothesis, Ag85 was measured in serum and urine by a monoclonal antibody-based dot immunobinding assay in 56 patients and controls with known skin test reactivity. Median serum Ag85 levels were 50- to 150-fold higher in patients with active tuberculosis than in patients with active<jats:italic>M. avium-intracellulare</jats:italic>disease or other nontuberculous pulmonary disease or in healthy controls (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>&lt; 0.001). The median and range of serum Ag85 in patients with active tuberculosis was not significantly different between skin test-positive and -negative subjects. Patients with active<jats:italic>M. avium</jats:italic>disease could be distinguished from those with disease due to<jats:italic>M. tuberculosis</jats:italic>by monoclonal anti-Ag85 antibodies of appropriate specificities. No increases in urinary Ag85 were detected in any patient, regardless of the Ag85 level in serum. Chromatographic analysis and immunoprecipitation studies of serum revealed that Ag85 existed in the serum of these patients complexed to either fibronectin or immunoglobulin G (IgG). Uncomplexed circulating Ag85 was demonstrable in serum from fewer than 20% of patients with active tuberculosis. In patients with active tuberculosis, Ag85 is therefore likely to circulate primarily as complexes with plasma fibronectin and IgG rather than in unbound form. The existence of Ag85 complexes with plasma proteins would account for its lack of urinary clearance.</jats:p> Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G Infection and Immunity
doi_str_mv 10.1128/iai.67.2.581-588.1999
facet_avail Online
Free
finc_class_facet Medizin
Biologie
format ElectronicArticle
fullrecord blob:ai-49-aHR0cDovL2R4LmRvaS5vcmcvMTAuMTEyOC9pYWkuNjcuMi41ODEtNTg4LjE5OTk
id ai-49-aHR0cDovL2R4LmRvaS5vcmcvMTAuMTEyOC9pYWkuNjcuMi41ODEtNTg4LjE5OTk
institution DE-Zi4
DE-14
DE-L229
DE-Zwi2
FID-BBI-DE-23
DE-Brt1
DE-Rs1
DE-D161
DE-Pl11
DE-Gla1
DE-105
DE-Bn3
DE-D275
DE-Ch1
DE-15
imprint American Society for Microbiology, 1999
imprint_str_mv American Society for Microbiology, 1999
issn 0019-9567
1098-5522
issn_str_mv 0019-9567
1098-5522
language English
mega_collection American Society for Microbiology (CrossRef)
match_str bentleyhibbert:1999:pathophysiologyofantigen85inpatientswithactivetuberculosisantigen85circulatesascomplexeswithfibronectinandimmunoglobuling:
publishDateSort 1999
publisher American Society for Microbiology
recordtype ai
series Infection and Immunity
source_id 49
title Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G
title_full Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G
title_fullStr Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G
title_full_unstemmed Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G
title_short Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G
title_sort pathophysiology of antigen 85 in patients with active tuberculosis: antigen 85 circulates as complexes with fibronectin and immunoglobulin g
topic Infectious Diseases
Immunology
Microbiology
Parasitology
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/iai.67.2.581-588.1999
publishDate 1999
physical 581-588
description <jats:title>ABSTRACT</jats:title><jats:p>Antigen 85 (Ag85) complex proteins are major secretory products of<jats:italic>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</jats:italic>and induce strong cellular and humoral immune responses in infected experimental animals and human beings. We have previously shown that nanogram doses of these 30- to 32-kDa fibronectin-binding proteins inhibit local expression of delayed hypersensitivity by a T-cell fibronectin-dependent mechanism. Circulating levels of Ag85 might be expected to be elevated in patients with active tuberculosis and possibly to play a role in systemic anergy in these patients. To test this hypothesis, Ag85 was measured in serum and urine by a monoclonal antibody-based dot immunobinding assay in 56 patients and controls with known skin test reactivity. Median serum Ag85 levels were 50- to 150-fold higher in patients with active tuberculosis than in patients with active<jats:italic>M. avium-intracellulare</jats:italic>disease or other nontuberculous pulmonary disease or in healthy controls (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>&lt; 0.001). The median and range of serum Ag85 in patients with active tuberculosis was not significantly different between skin test-positive and -negative subjects. Patients with active<jats:italic>M. avium</jats:italic>disease could be distinguished from those with disease due to<jats:italic>M. tuberculosis</jats:italic>by monoclonal anti-Ag85 antibodies of appropriate specificities. No increases in urinary Ag85 were detected in any patient, regardless of the Ag85 level in serum. Chromatographic analysis and immunoprecipitation studies of serum revealed that Ag85 existed in the serum of these patients complexed to either fibronectin or immunoglobulin G (IgG). Uncomplexed circulating Ag85 was demonstrable in serum from fewer than 20% of patients with active tuberculosis. In patients with active tuberculosis, Ag85 is therefore likely to circulate primarily as complexes with plasma fibronectin and IgG rather than in unbound form. The existence of Ag85 complexes with plasma proteins would account for its lack of urinary clearance.</jats:p>
container_issue 2
container_start_page 581
container_title Infection and Immunity
container_volume 67
format_de105 Article, E-Article
format_de14 Article, E-Article
format_de15 Article, E-Article
format_de520 Article, E-Article
format_de540 Article, E-Article
format_dech1 Article, E-Article
format_ded117 Article, E-Article
format_degla1 E-Article
format_del152 Buch
format_del189 Article, E-Article
format_dezi4 Article
format_dezwi2 Article, E-Article
format_finc Article, E-Article
format_nrw Article, E-Article
_version_ 1778926783404441606
geogr_code not assigned
last_indexed 2023-10-05T14:39:40.507Z
geogr_code_person not assigned
openURL url_ver=Z39.88-2004&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&ctx_enc=info%3Aofi%2Fenc%3AUTF-8&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2Fvufind.svn.sourceforge.net%3Agenerator&rft.title=Pathophysiology+of+Antigen+85+in+Patients+with+Active+Tuberculosis%3A+Antigen+85+Circulates+as+Complexes+with+Fibronectin+and+Immunoglobulin+G&rft.date=1999-02-01&genre=article&issn=1098-5522&volume=67&issue=2&spage=581&epage=588&pages=581-588&jtitle=Infection+and+Immunity&atitle=Pathophysiology+of+Antigen+85+in+Patients+with+Active+Tuberculosis%3A+Antigen+85+Circulates+as+Complexes+with+Fibronectin+and+Immunoglobulin+G&aulast=Godfrey&aufirst=Henry+P.&rft_id=info%3Adoi%2F10.1128%2Fiai.67.2.581-588.1999&rft.language%5B0%5D=eng
SOLR
_version_ 1778926783404441606
author Bentley-Hibbert, Stuart I., Quan, Xin, Newman, Thomas, Huygen, Kris, Godfrey, Henry P.
author_facet Bentley-Hibbert, Stuart I., Quan, Xin, Newman, Thomas, Huygen, Kris, Godfrey, Henry P., Bentley-Hibbert, Stuart I., Quan, Xin, Newman, Thomas, Huygen, Kris, Godfrey, Henry P.
author_sort bentley-hibbert, stuart i.
container_issue 2
container_start_page 581
container_title Infection and Immunity
container_volume 67
description <jats:title>ABSTRACT</jats:title><jats:p>Antigen 85 (Ag85) complex proteins are major secretory products of<jats:italic>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</jats:italic>and induce strong cellular and humoral immune responses in infected experimental animals and human beings. We have previously shown that nanogram doses of these 30- to 32-kDa fibronectin-binding proteins inhibit local expression of delayed hypersensitivity by a T-cell fibronectin-dependent mechanism. Circulating levels of Ag85 might be expected to be elevated in patients with active tuberculosis and possibly to play a role in systemic anergy in these patients. To test this hypothesis, Ag85 was measured in serum and urine by a monoclonal antibody-based dot immunobinding assay in 56 patients and controls with known skin test reactivity. Median serum Ag85 levels were 50- to 150-fold higher in patients with active tuberculosis than in patients with active<jats:italic>M. avium-intracellulare</jats:italic>disease or other nontuberculous pulmonary disease or in healthy controls (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>&lt; 0.001). The median and range of serum Ag85 in patients with active tuberculosis was not significantly different between skin test-positive and -negative subjects. Patients with active<jats:italic>M. avium</jats:italic>disease could be distinguished from those with disease due to<jats:italic>M. tuberculosis</jats:italic>by monoclonal anti-Ag85 antibodies of appropriate specificities. No increases in urinary Ag85 were detected in any patient, regardless of the Ag85 level in serum. Chromatographic analysis and immunoprecipitation studies of serum revealed that Ag85 existed in the serum of these patients complexed to either fibronectin or immunoglobulin G (IgG). Uncomplexed circulating Ag85 was demonstrable in serum from fewer than 20% of patients with active tuberculosis. In patients with active tuberculosis, Ag85 is therefore likely to circulate primarily as complexes with plasma fibronectin and IgG rather than in unbound form. The existence of Ag85 complexes with plasma proteins would account for its lack of urinary clearance.</jats:p>
doi_str_mv 10.1128/iai.67.2.581-588.1999
facet_avail Online, Free
finc_class_facet Medizin, Biologie
format ElectronicArticle
format_de105 Article, E-Article
format_de14 Article, E-Article
format_de15 Article, E-Article
format_de520 Article, E-Article
format_de540 Article, E-Article
format_dech1 Article, E-Article
format_ded117 Article, E-Article
format_degla1 E-Article
format_del152 Buch
format_del189 Article, E-Article
format_dezi4 Article
format_dezwi2 Article, E-Article
format_finc Article, E-Article
format_nrw Article, E-Article
geogr_code not assigned
geogr_code_person not assigned
id ai-49-aHR0cDovL2R4LmRvaS5vcmcvMTAuMTEyOC9pYWkuNjcuMi41ODEtNTg4LjE5OTk
imprint American Society for Microbiology, 1999
imprint_str_mv American Society for Microbiology, 1999
institution DE-Zi4, DE-14, DE-L229, DE-Zwi2, FID-BBI-DE-23, DE-Brt1, DE-Rs1, DE-D161, DE-Pl11, DE-Gla1, DE-105, DE-Bn3, DE-D275, DE-Ch1, DE-15
issn 0019-9567, 1098-5522
issn_str_mv 0019-9567, 1098-5522
language English
last_indexed 2023-10-05T14:39:40.507Z
match_str bentleyhibbert:1999:pathophysiologyofantigen85inpatientswithactivetuberculosisantigen85circulatesascomplexeswithfibronectinandimmunoglobuling:
mega_collection American Society for Microbiology (CrossRef)
physical 581-588
publishDate 1999
publishDateSort 1999
publisher American Society for Microbiology
recordtype ai
series Infection and Immunity
source_id 49
spelling Bentley-Hibbert, Stuart I. Quan, Xin Newman, Thomas Huygen, Kris Godfrey, Henry P. 0019-9567 1098-5522 American Society for Microbiology Infectious Diseases Immunology Microbiology Parasitology http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/iai.67.2.581-588.1999 <jats:title>ABSTRACT</jats:title><jats:p>Antigen 85 (Ag85) complex proteins are major secretory products of<jats:italic>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</jats:italic>and induce strong cellular and humoral immune responses in infected experimental animals and human beings. We have previously shown that nanogram doses of these 30- to 32-kDa fibronectin-binding proteins inhibit local expression of delayed hypersensitivity by a T-cell fibronectin-dependent mechanism. Circulating levels of Ag85 might be expected to be elevated in patients with active tuberculosis and possibly to play a role in systemic anergy in these patients. To test this hypothesis, Ag85 was measured in serum and urine by a monoclonal antibody-based dot immunobinding assay in 56 patients and controls with known skin test reactivity. Median serum Ag85 levels were 50- to 150-fold higher in patients with active tuberculosis than in patients with active<jats:italic>M. avium-intracellulare</jats:italic>disease or other nontuberculous pulmonary disease or in healthy controls (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>&lt; 0.001). The median and range of serum Ag85 in patients with active tuberculosis was not significantly different between skin test-positive and -negative subjects. Patients with active<jats:italic>M. avium</jats:italic>disease could be distinguished from those with disease due to<jats:italic>M. tuberculosis</jats:italic>by monoclonal anti-Ag85 antibodies of appropriate specificities. No increases in urinary Ag85 were detected in any patient, regardless of the Ag85 level in serum. Chromatographic analysis and immunoprecipitation studies of serum revealed that Ag85 existed in the serum of these patients complexed to either fibronectin or immunoglobulin G (IgG). Uncomplexed circulating Ag85 was demonstrable in serum from fewer than 20% of patients with active tuberculosis. In patients with active tuberculosis, Ag85 is therefore likely to circulate primarily as complexes with plasma fibronectin and IgG rather than in unbound form. The existence of Ag85 complexes with plasma proteins would account for its lack of urinary clearance.</jats:p> Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G Infection and Immunity
spellingShingle Bentley-Hibbert, Stuart I., Quan, Xin, Newman, Thomas, Huygen, Kris, Godfrey, Henry P., Infection and Immunity, Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G, Infectious Diseases, Immunology, Microbiology, Parasitology
title Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G
title_full Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G
title_fullStr Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G
title_full_unstemmed Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G
title_short Pathophysiology of Antigen 85 in Patients with Active Tuberculosis: Antigen 85 Circulates as Complexes with Fibronectin and Immunoglobulin G
title_sort pathophysiology of antigen 85 in patients with active tuberculosis: antigen 85 circulates as complexes with fibronectin and immunoglobulin g
topic Infectious Diseases, Immunology, Microbiology, Parasitology
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/iai.67.2.581-588.1999