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Reduced Herbicide Rates—A Canadian Perspective

Bibliographic Details
Journal Title: Weed Technology
Authors and Corporations: Doyle, Patrick, Stypa, Marian
In: Weed Technology, 18, 2004, 4, p. 1157-1165
Type of Resource: E-Article
Language: English
published:
Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Subjects:
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rft.atitle Reduced Herbicide Rates—A Canadian Perspective
rft.epage 1165
rft.genre article
rft.issn 0890-037X
1550-2740
rft.issue 4
rft.jtitle Weed Technology
rft.tpages 9
rft.pages 1157-1165
rft.pub Cambridge University Press (CUP)
rft.date 2004-12-01
x.date 2004-12-01T00:00:00Z
rft.spage 1157
rft.volume 18
abstract <jats:p>Identification of the appropriate use rate is a critical first step in the herbicide development process because use rates affect product utility, market value, and the various risk assessments within the regulatory review process prior to registration. For a given herbicide to be commercially successful, it must provide consistent and sustained efficacy based on a use rate structure that meets customer requirements over a wide range of conditions. Recently, recommendations have been made that advocate the use of herbicide use rates below those outlined on registered product label text. Such advice tends to be based on field work and predictive models designed to identify specific conditions where reduced herbicide use rates are theoretically optimized as dictated by threshold values with assumed levels of commercially acceptable weed control. Unfortunately, many other studies indicate that the use of reduced herbicide rates is not without variability of herbicide efficacy and economic risk. Consequently, reduced use rate theories and related predictive models are often of limited practical value to growers. Aside from inconsistent performance, weed control strategies based on reduced herbicide use rates are not a solution to prevent or even delay target site resistance. In fact, prolonged use of sublethal use rates may select for metabolic resistance and add future weed management challenges by replenishing the weed seed bank. Much effort in terms of development time and resources are invested before product commercialization to ensure that product labels are easily understood and provide value to growers. In this regard, every effort is made to identify the lowest effective use rate that will consistently control target weeds and lead to economic optimization for both the grower and manufacturer.</jats:p>
authors Array ( [rft.aulast] => Doyle [rft.aufirst] => Patrick )
Array ( [rft.aulast] => Stypa [rft.aufirst] => Marian )
doi 10.1614/wt-04-050r2
languages eng
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1614/wt-04-050r2
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Agronomy and Crop Science
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description <jats:p>Identification of the appropriate use rate is a critical first step in the herbicide development process because use rates affect product utility, market value, and the various risk assessments within the regulatory review process prior to registration. For a given herbicide to be commercially successful, it must provide consistent and sustained efficacy based on a use rate structure that meets customer requirements over a wide range of conditions. Recently, recommendations have been made that advocate the use of herbicide use rates below those outlined on registered product label text. Such advice tends to be based on field work and predictive models designed to identify specific conditions where reduced herbicide use rates are theoretically optimized as dictated by threshold values with assumed levels of commercially acceptable weed control. Unfortunately, many other studies indicate that the use of reduced herbicide rates is not without variability of herbicide efficacy and economic risk. Consequently, reduced use rate theories and related predictive models are often of limited practical value to growers. Aside from inconsistent performance, weed control strategies based on reduced herbicide use rates are not a solution to prevent or even delay target site resistance. In fact, prolonged use of sublethal use rates may select for metabolic resistance and add future weed management challenges by replenishing the weed seed bank. Much effort in terms of development time and resources are invested before product commercialization to ensure that product labels are easily understood and provide value to growers. In this regard, every effort is made to identify the lowest effective use rate that will consistently control target weeds and lead to economic optimization for both the grower and manufacturer.</jats:p>
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spelling Doyle, Patrick Stypa, Marian 0890-037X 1550-2740 Cambridge University Press (CUP) Plant Science Agronomy and Crop Science http://dx.doi.org/10.1614/wt-04-050r2 <jats:p>Identification of the appropriate use rate is a critical first step in the herbicide development process because use rates affect product utility, market value, and the various risk assessments within the regulatory review process prior to registration. For a given herbicide to be commercially successful, it must provide consistent and sustained efficacy based on a use rate structure that meets customer requirements over a wide range of conditions. Recently, recommendations have been made that advocate the use of herbicide use rates below those outlined on registered product label text. Such advice tends to be based on field work and predictive models designed to identify specific conditions where reduced herbicide use rates are theoretically optimized as dictated by threshold values with assumed levels of commercially acceptable weed control. Unfortunately, many other studies indicate that the use of reduced herbicide rates is not without variability of herbicide efficacy and economic risk. Consequently, reduced use rate theories and related predictive models are often of limited practical value to growers. Aside from inconsistent performance, weed control strategies based on reduced herbicide use rates are not a solution to prevent or even delay target site resistance. In fact, prolonged use of sublethal use rates may select for metabolic resistance and add future weed management challenges by replenishing the weed seed bank. Much effort in terms of development time and resources are invested before product commercialization to ensure that product labels are easily understood and provide value to growers. In this regard, every effort is made to identify the lowest effective use rate that will consistently control target weeds and lead to economic optimization for both the grower and manufacturer.</jats:p> Reduced Herbicide Rates—A Canadian Perspective Weed Technology
spellingShingle Doyle, Patrick, Stypa, Marian, Weed Technology, Reduced Herbicide Rates—A Canadian Perspective, Plant Science, Agronomy and Crop Science
title Reduced Herbicide Rates—A Canadian Perspective
title_full Reduced Herbicide Rates—A Canadian Perspective
title_fullStr Reduced Herbicide Rates—A Canadian Perspective
title_full_unstemmed Reduced Herbicide Rates—A Canadian Perspective
title_short Reduced Herbicide Rates—A Canadian Perspective
title_sort reduced herbicide rates—a canadian perspective
topic Plant Science, Agronomy and Crop Science
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1614/wt-04-050r2